Noon Sakinah Rules

Noon Sakinah Rules
If you’re learning Arabic, or even speak Arabic and want to understand Tajweed a little bit more, then this article is for you.

 

It’s crucial to understand the intricacies of Tajweed, it’s essential for reading the Quran and for understanding many things in Arabic, and among these rules is the “Noon Sakinah”.

 

So, in this article, we will give you a guide to understanding the Noon Sakinah rules, how to pronounce them properly, and the rules and principles.

 

By examining these rules in detail, learners and enthusiasts alike can enhance their proficiency in Quranic recitation, embodying the reverence and precision inherent in the sacred art of Tajweed, so all you have to do is just keep reading.

 

Noon Sakinah Rules

“Noon Sakinah” is a term used in Tajweed, the set of rules governing the pronunciation of the Quranic Arabic. 

 

It refers to a specific pronunciation rule concerning the letter “noon” (ن) when it is followed by a “sakinah” (a sukoon), which is a diacritical mark indicating the absence of a vowel sound.

 

The rule states that when a “noon sakinah” occurs at the end of a word or before a pause (whether it’s the end of a verse or a stopping point in recitation), it is pronounced with complete closure of the nasal passage, hence the term “sakinah,” which means “silence” or “stillness.” 

 

This means that the sound of the letter “noon” is not prolonged, and it’s stopped abruptly.

 

For Example:

  • In the word “قَلْبٍ” (qalbin), the “noon” (ن) is followed by a “sakinah” (ٍ) and occurs at the end of the word. 

 

In accordance with the rule, it should be pronounced with a complete nasal closure, without prolonging the sound of the “noon.”

 

Following Tajweed rules is important for correctly reciting the Quran, and achieving mastery necessitates dedicated practice under the guidance of experienced instructors.

 

What Is the Izhar Rule?

The Izhar rule (إظهار) in Tajweed refers to the clear and distinct pronunciation of the letter “noon sakinah” or “tanween” when it is followed by one of the letters of Izhar. Izhar means “to make clear” or “to pronounce openly.” 

 

The letters of Izhar are: ج (jeem), ط (taa), د (daal), ت (taa), ذ (dhaal), ز (zaa), ص (saad), ل (laam), and ن (noon).

 

When a “noon sakinah” or “tanween” is followed by any of these letters, it is pronounced clearly without assimilation or nasalization. 

 

Instead of merging the sound of the “noon” with the following letter, as in Idgham or Iqlab, the “noon” is pronounced distinctly.

 

For example:

  • In the word “جَمَلٌ” (jamalun), the “noon” (ن) is followed by a “jeem” (ج), which is one of the letters of Izhar. 

 

Therefore, the “noon” is pronounced clearly without assimilation or nasalization.

 

  • Similarly, in the word “لَذَا” (ladhaa), the “noon” (ن) is followed by a “dhaal” (ذ), another letter of Izhar, and thus is pronounced openly and distinctly.

 

The Izhar rule is crucial for maintaining the proper pronunciation of Arabic words, particularly in Quranic recitation (Tajweed).

 

What Are the 4 Rules of Tanween?

Tanween refers to the diacritical marks (symbols) placed on Arabic letters to indicate a nunation or the sound of an “n” or “an” at the end of a word. 

 

There are four main rules (or principles) related to the pronunciation of tanween in Tajweed:

 

  1. Idgham (اضغام): Idgham means assimilation. This rule states that when a word with tanween is followed by one of the letters of idgham (ي، م، ن، ل، ر، و), the tanween is assimilated into the following letter, and the sound of the tanween is not pronounced distinctly. 

 

Instead, the sound of the following letter is emphasized. There are two types of Idgham:

 

  • Idgham with ghunnah (Idgham bil ghunnah): In this type, a nasal sound is added, which is called ghunnah. 

 

It occurs when the tanween is followed by one of the letters of idgham, and the following letter is one of the six letters of idgham. 

 

For example, in the word “بَيْتٌ”, the tanween (ٌ) is assimilated into the following letter “ت”, resulting in a nasalized sound and lengthening the pronunciation of the “ت”.

 

  • Idgham without ghunnah (Idgham bila ghunnah): This occurs when the tanween is followed by one of the letters of idgham, but the sound of ghunnah is not added. 

 

It happens specifically when the tanween is followed by a “و” or a “ي” without a vowel sign. For example, in the word “كِتَابٌ”, the tanween (ٌ) is assimilated into the following letter “ب” without a nasalized sound.

 

  1. Iqlab (إقلاب): Iqlab means conversion. This rule applies when a word with tanween is followed by the letter “ب” (ba), and the tanween is changed into a “م” (meem), represented by a “م” with a sukoon (ــْ). 

 

For example, in the word “أَدْبَارًا”, the tanween (ً) is converted into a “م” (meem) with a sukoon after the letter “ب”.

 

  1. Ikhfa (إخفاء): Ikhfa means hiding or concealment. This rule states that when a word with tanween is followed by one of the remaining letters of the Arabic alphabet, the sound of the tanween is not pronounced distinctly. 

 

Instead, it is slightly hidden or muted, and the sound of the following letter is emphasized. For example, in the word “كَتَبٌ”, the tanween (ٌ) is slightly muted when followed by the letter “ب”, and the emphasis is placed on the “ب”.

 

  1. Ikhfa’ Shafawi (إخفاء شفوي): This is a special case of ikhfa, where the tanween is followed by one of the letters “ش” (sheen) or “ص” (sad), and the sound of the tanween is not pronounced distinctly. 

 

Instead, it is slightly muted, and the sound of the following letter is emphasized. This rule applies only to a specific subset of words.

 

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